Growing Things

Another Bloomin' Friday

Every day, something new in the garden!  It's such an exciting time to stroll around - seeing what's popped into bloom overnight.

Today, we have . . . 

My favorite spring bulb - grape hyacinth.  I just love the contrast of purple and green.  I use that particular color combination all over my garden throughout the season -- but this is really my first real taste of it each year.

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Red buds are nearly exploding.  They're so subtle -- and make such a lovely scene when I look out my window and see my little red bud . . . with my neighbor's blooming trees as background.

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Lilacs are moving up the bloom-list with a bullet.  This is a new lilac bush I just planted last year (in a corner where something else had . . . failed to thrive) and these are my first blooms.  I'm so excited.

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Virginia bluebells just dancing in the breeze.  (Like so much dancing that I can't get a good shot.)   Virginia bluebells are so lovely while they last -- but they only last about 5 minutes, so enjoy what you see -- bad shot and all!  (Those are celadon poppies in the background, in case you were wondering.)

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The hops are already trying to take over the world.  I love the way they climb the arbor -- and Tom loves growing them.  But.  They are very high maintenance!

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Ferns are unfurling (at least the ones that live up close to the foundation).  These are actually "volunteer ferns" that seeded themselves (or whatever you call it when we're actually talking about spores) up near the foundation.  Later, I'll dig them up and plant them somewhere else.  But for now, I'll enjoy watching them up against the warm foundation.

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And then -- a big surprise!

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Yep.  That sad, little pot?  Nestled in among the biggest weed patch in my garden?  It's a Little Honey oak leaf hydrangea I bought last May at the Master Gardener Plant Sale.  Yeah.  Last May.  I couldn't figure out where, exactly, I wanted to plant it when I first brought it home (which is a problem I often have - sort of the gardener-version of eyes-too-big-for-the-stomach) -- and then, well.  Last summer was a bit of a mess, and it just sat there.  All year.

Anyway.  LOOK!  It has leaves!  It LIVES!  It survived both my neglect AND our mild winter.  I will happily find the perfect spot for it this year!

I just love watching my garden come alive again each spring!

Enjoy the weekend.


Bloomin' Friday

Spring is here, that's for sure.

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But it's that one-step-forward-two-steps-back kind of Spring.

Teasing, fickle Spring.

A warm and 75ºF day . . . followed by a few (too many) chilly, dreary, rainy days.

Ugh.

Tedious.

I'm just not very patient.

But my garden is letting me know that it won't be long now.  Leaves are beginning to emerge.  My daffodils are blooming.  I have "lawn violets" and dandelions feeding the bees in my yard.

What else is going on in my garden?

Well, I'm eagerly watching my little redbud.  Maybe blooms next week?

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And my grape hyacinths (at least the ones in the West-facing beds) are beginning to pop.

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And the first blooms are emerging on my star magnolia tree -- with the promise of many more to come.

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Right now, though?  It's the hellebores that are the real stars of the show in my garden!

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Hard working.  Super showy.  Loaded with buds.

Best of all?  The deer won't touch 'em!

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And, just to keep me smiling, the hops are suddenly up . . . and spreading fast.  Ready to take over the world!

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Here we go!  Just like that . . . it's gardening season again.

 


Looking Down

The windows in my house, for the most part, don't have window coverings.  Some are bare; while some just have light, woven blinds.

Because we live on a hill and, for the most part, neighbors and passersby can't see in.

Because I like a lot of light.

Because I like to look out.

But there's one window I don't really use much.  It looks out over the north side of my house, from high up ("3rd floor" - counting the walkout basement on that side of the house).

It used to be Brian's room.  Now it's my "art room" -- where I paint and draw and (pretty much) store all my art supplies.

The view?

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My "backyard" (delineated by the fence) is an L-shape.  This view represents the short side of the L.  (The patio and my pergola and most of my garden beds are on the other side of the house -- the long side of the L.)  You can also see my neighbors' driveway.  And the street - if you look through the trees.

It's kind of a bird's eye view.

If you remember past blog posts . . . of my garden . . . that corner (that really dead-looking corner) is the newest area of my garden, and it looks pretty good when things get going.  But now?  Not so much.

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When I look down on my yard from this window at this time of year, I can't help thinking about my garden and mentally creating a list of things I want to do back there. . . 

  • pruning the beautyberry down to the ground
  • figuring out what to do where the trees were cut down last fall (victims of diplodia tip blight)
  • transplanting the hostas from the front yard side of the fence to the backyard side of the fence (so the deer have less chance of munching them)
  • is there any way to create a labyrinth for walking? (probably not, because the hill is pretty steep back there)
  • maybe this is the year to finally decide on steps down the hill?

Etc.

I've also decided I need to look out this window more often - especially as my garden comes to life.  Because having a bird's eye view gives an interesting perspective.  (And I can't wait to see my little redbud in the corner . . . blooming . . . from way up here!)

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Today's post is part of Think Write Thursday. Click here to read other posts on today's topic, or click here to sign up to receive weekly prompts.

 


Bloomin' Friday . . . Winter Edition

It's a cold and gloomy Friday here in my corner of the world.  It's sort of trying to snow.  The sun is nowhere to be seen.  It's gray out there.  And bleak.  And I have a bit of a cold.  Ugh.

This . . . is exactly the time I need amaryllis blooms to brighten my day.

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This bloom is just stunning.  But it doesn't really photograph all that well.  It's a bulb called 'Grand Diva' from White Flower Farm -- and it truly is grand!  It's not really red, but it's not quite burgundy, either.  It looks a lot like velvet, and it has lovely, tonal highlights.

The flowers are huge!  There are currently four blooms on the first stem, and the bud on the second stem is just beginning to open.

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On the other end of the bloom-spectrum, this one ('Tres Chic,' also from White Flower Farm) is winding down.  But if you look closely, you can see the bud on the second stem just beginning to open up.  (This is the bulb that started rotting.  I seemed to have halted the rot, but that second stem never really got any taller.  I definitely stressed this one.)

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This one, 'Rosy Star' from White Flower Farm, is just opening.  Both buds at the same time.  I can't wait to see this one.  I love white amaryllis -- and this one is supposed to have a pinkish cast.  Anticipation!

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And then . . . there is my ver-r-r-ry slow amaryllis.  This one is definitely taking it's time!  By process of elimination, I know that this one is called 'Stardust' (White Flower Farm) -- and it is the one I'm most excited to see.  But.  I'll need to continue being patient.  Because it's going to be awhile yet.

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Some years I pick up amaryllis bulbs at local nurseries; some years I pick up "kits" at Target; some years I go the grocery-store-rescue route; and some years I order bulbs from White Flower Farm.  They are ALL wonderful options when it comes to having beautiful blooms in the house!  But.  I've gotta say . . . those bulbs from White Flower Farm?  They are worth every penny!  The bulbs are big and healthy.  The blooms are gigantic.  The stems are more sturdy and don't flop over so easily.  And the colors on the blooms are just amazing.  (Plus -- you get to pick which varieties you want.  Which is always the hardest part for me - but most fun, too.)  

And, because I made such an investment this year (bulbs from WFF run between $18 and $25 per plain bulb), I'm thinking I might want to "rebuild" my bulbs -- and try to get them to bloom again next year.  

Interested in preserving your own bulbs for next year?  Here are the "rebuilding" steps from White Flower Farm:

  • After the last bloom fades, cut off the flower stalk 3-5" above the bulb.
  • DO NOT CUT THE LEAVES OFF.  They produce food that will be stored in the bulb -- and the bulb needs them!
  • Put the plant in a sunny window where it will receive 6-8 hours of direct sun each day.  (South-facing is best, but I don't have any south-facing windows, so I go with an east-facing window.  It seems to work.)
  • Water when the top inch of the potting mix is dry to the touch, and begin fertilizing with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer once a month.  (The fertilizer is rather important.  Those poor bulbs are exhausted after producing those flowers!)
  • In the spring - once the danger of frost has passed - set the pot outdoors in full sun OR knock the bulbs out of the pots and plant them right in the ground in a sunny location.  Continue to provide fertilizer.
  • In the fall, bring the bulb indoors (WFF recommends waiting until the frost blackens the leaves), cut the foliage off just above the bulb, and store in a cool (55 degrees F), dark place (basement) for 8-10 weeks.  Don't water.  Don't feed.
  • Then, re-pot the bulb and water it.  Thereafter, keep the potting mix almost dry until new growth emerges.  (And keep your fingers crossed!)

I'm going to try it this year!  I need some indoor gardening chores to get me through these dark days of winter.

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I also picked up another blooming bulb at the grocery store a couple of weeks ago:

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Here's some "gardener advice" if you see these in the grocery store and are tempted to grab a pot for yourself:  Unless it's a gift for someone and you need blooming RIGHT NOW, be particular about your bulb purchase.  Pick the pot with barely-just-emerging buds.  Kind of like this . . . 

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That's the same pot of hyacinth, two weeks earlier.  By choosing the most just-emerging pot I could find, I have had the joy of watching the buds emerge -- and I'll get to enjoy the blooms longer, too!  

Happy Friday, everyone!

 


Hygge . . . for the Gardener

This gardener decided . . . what better way to bring hygge to the dark days of winter than by nurturing some lovely amaryllis bulbs.  

Not only will there be joy and comfort in the planting, but also in the watching -- and certainly in the blooming.

So I splurged!  

I ordered four different amaryllis bulbs from that Flagship of Gardening - White Flower Farm.  (I gotta tell you -- even just the choosing which bulbs to order was a hygge-moment!)  Then, I gathered up my vases and some stones for planting, and I waited for delivery.

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The bulbs arrived earlier this week, and yesterday - in the midst of our first major snowfall - I planted them.

Let's just say . . . these bulbs are big.

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Like . . . pretty much too big for any of the containers I had chosen.

But I think it'll work out.

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Now, I'm going to sit back and watch the show.

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Hygge . . . for the gardener!

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And be sure to check out Bonny's blog.  Her annual Amaryllis Watch has begun!  (She is a true amaryllis-whisperer!)

 


Golden Days

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I'm enjoying my garden's "golden days" right now.

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Although I have a few other fall colors going on, it's most gold in my late fall garden.

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The view from my living room window is pretty awesome right now.

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But.

Are you noticing something kind of . . . weird, in these photos?

Like . . . what's that golden pine tree doing out there?  

Is it dead?  Does it have a disease?  What is UP with that tree????

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Well, for starters . . . it IS turning gold.

And . . . it's not a pine tree.

It's a larch tree -- a deciduous conifer!  That means it looks like a regular, old conifer for most of the year.  But, come fall, the needles actually turn color and fall off -- just like a maple or a birch or any other deciduous tree.

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Once my larch loses its leaves, though . . . it looks like a giant, dead, Charlie Brown tree all winter long!  But for now?  Golden!

 

 

 


It's the Berries . . .

My garden is winding down for the season.  The leaves are turning color, and the flowers are on their last gasp. 

Now is the time for berries to shine!

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This absolutely lovely plant is the beautyberry -- and the berries?  That's their actual, un-retouched color!  I cut the plant to the ground in the spring, and the foliage is all rather nondescript during the summer, but - oh, my! - does it ever SHINE in the fall!  One of my favorites.  (The squirrels and birds are big fans as well.)

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These are the fruit/berries of my Washington Hawthorn tree.  They are lovely berries -- and such a treat for neighborhood squirrels and - one of my favorite birds - the cedar waxwing.  I didn't plant the Hawthorn; it was here when we purchased our house -- and I have a rather love/hate relationship with the tree.  I love the berries in fall.  But.  The tree has HUGE thorns (thus, the name), and early on, while doing some pruning, I impaled my thumb joint with one of the thorns.  (I nearly had to have surgery to correct the damage.  Thankfully, it healed without.)  I have since made my peace with the tree, and enjoy the berries (and accompanying wildlife) every fall.

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A couple of years ago, I "rescued" this porcelain vine from a clearance table at Lowes.  I had no idea the berries were so beautiful!  This $1.00 plant gives me so much joy every fall -- the colors are glorious.  (And the birds love it, too!)

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These are not berries . . . even though they kind of look like them.  These are seeds emerging from their seedpod on my star magnolia.  They're so exotic-looking -- and were such a surprise the first time I found them. 

The garden brings joy in every season.  In the fall?  It's the berries!